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Amerikanska Forum Index -> Life in Sweden

Swedish partner and living/working in a second EU country

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amhilde
stor stark
stor stark


Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 334
Location: US: St Paul, MN & Madison, WI SE: Strängnäs
Swedish partner and living/working in a second EU country

Question-

We are in the US now- the Swede is getting adjusted to 1) US traffic in the suburbs, 2) capitalism and 3) working culture here. We have been discussing the possibility of moving to the UK for him to complete university rather than the US due to the high cost of education. The UK would also be better for me as I have work experience there and work exists in my industry. If we are not married, and would likely not be by the hypothetical time of move ( say next year), is it possible for me to gain working privileges based on our relationship? I thought I read somewhere someone doing this once before ( could have been on another forum though). Anyone try this?
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Post Wed Aug 29, 2007 9:41 pm 
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Sandy
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Moved to Original Flavor Forum
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Post Thu Aug 30, 2007 6:53 am 
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Daniel
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Joined: Oct 23, 2004
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Location: Stockholm, Sweden

I do believe EU states that an EU citizenship who moves to another EU country can take his non-EU relationship person and they will be allowed to stay there. However, I also think that three countries are not included in this -- if I remember correctly, it's Denmark, Ireland, and the UK. But I am not sure really...

If you are not married, how is he in the US? The engagement thing?

Post Thu Aug 30, 2007 10:37 am 
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Sydney
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Joined: Sep 04, 2003
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Location: France

The short answer is yes, depending on which country. The UK recognizes registered partnerships, and EU directive 2004/38/EC requires that a person with a durable relationship, duly attested be permitted recognized as a family member. In practice, this is sometimes done, sometimes not done.

These people can answer your every question:

http://www.immigrationboards.com/viewforum.php?f=3

Post Thu Aug 30, 2007 3:01 pm 
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LindaC
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Unless Denmark has recently changed their rules, an EU citizen can move their partner to Denmark with them. (It's how Danes get around the Danish immigration laws. They move to Skane, then use EU rules to move their loved one back with them to Denmark.)
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Post Thu Aug 30, 2007 3:12 pm 
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Daniel
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I swear I saw that in an article at the Swedish migration board's site last year.

Here, I found it:


quote:
2006-04-28
Ökad rörlighet med nya lagar

Från och med den 30 april blir det enklare för EU/EES - medborgare att flytta till ett annat EU/EES-land. Även personer som endast har uppehållstillstånd i ett EU-land kommer att få större möjligheter att flytta inom EU. Dessa förändringar beror på nya gemensamma regler inom EU.

Medborgare i ett EU/EES-land och deras familjemedlemmar kommer från den 30 april inte längre behöva söka uppehållstillstånd när de vill stanna längre än tre månader i Sverige. I kraft av sitt medborgarskap har de rätt att vistas i Sverige ändå, så kallad uppehållsrätt, om de till exempel arbetar, driver företag eller studerar här.

Registrering och uppehållskort
EU/EES - medborgare ska i fortsättningen registrera sig hos Migrationsverket om de vill vara här en längre tid. Efter fem år kan de få permanent uppehållsrätt i Sverige. Familjemedlemmar som själva inte är EU/EES-medborgare ska ansöka om uppehållskort hos Migrationsverket. Uppehållskortet gäller så länge en person är bosatt i Sverige och efter fem år kan han eller hon få permanent uppehållskort.

"Varaktigt bosatta"får särskild status
De som har haft uppehållstillstånd i ett EU-land i fem år utan avbrott, men inte är EU-medborgare, kan från den 30 april få status som "varaktigt bosatta". Det är Migrationsverket som handlägger en ansökan om att bli varaktigt bosatt i Sverige.

Som varaktigt bosatt får en person vissa rättigheter, som ökade möjligheter att flytta mellan EU-länderna för att till exempel arbeta eller studera. Denna persons familjemedlemmar har då rätt att följa med. De olika EU-länderna kan ha olika krav för att ge en person uppehållstillstånd som varaktigt bosatt.

I Storbritannien, Irland och Danmark kan man varken få status som varaktigt bosatt eller uppehållstillstånd som varaktigt bosatt i ett annat EU-land.

Not quite the same as I was thinking I guess, but still some limitations there compared to the rest of the EU.

Post Thu Aug 30, 2007 3:34 pm 
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LindaC
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quote:
Originally posted by Daniel:
I Storbritannien, Irland och Danmark kan man varken få status som varaktigt bosatt eller uppehållstillstånd som varaktigt bosatt i ett annat EU-land.


This is correct (as I recall). You can't get "long term residency" in Denmark nor use "long term residency" in place of EU citizenship.
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Post Thu Aug 30, 2007 3:46 pm 
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amhilde
stor stark
stor stark


Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 334
Location: US: St Paul, MN & Madison, WI SE: Strängnäs

Ah yes, immigrationboards- I was on there for a while a few years ago due to applying for the HSMP program for the UK and being denied for something trivial- they are quite helpful though.

Thanks for posting up some of that information- I will check into it.

Daniel- He was a 2007 Diversity Visa lottery winner- his green card is not relationship specific.
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Post Thu Aug 30, 2007 7:28 pm 
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